Just finished the first leg of my media tour for POP!, and had the opportunity to go in dozens of bookstores across the country.

After signing copies of my books, I usually take a few minutes to browse through the store, looking for fresh examples of clever titles that stopped me in my tracks and compelled me to give the book a second look.

Kudos to the following books for doing just that.

Momfidence: An Oreo Never Killed Anybody and Other Secrets of Happier Parenting Author Paula Spencer uses what I call a Half and Half Word to coin a new term. Kudos. When you coin a new word, you become the de facto topic expert – because you created and named the topic.

Shopportunity How to Be a Retail Revolutionary by Kate Newlin has been getting a lot of media attention these days – as least partially because of its innovative Alphabetized title. Freakonomics is another example of an Alphabetized title.

Fling or Ring Which Finger are You Going to Give Him? Author Alison James is positioning herself for this year’s POP! Hall of Fame because her title is Purposeful, Original, and Pithy. Her previous book, I Used to Miss Him . . . But My Aim is Improving also has an edgy attitude, perfect for this genre.

I laughed out loud at a book by Jackie Ivie displayed in the front window of a bookstore in San Francisco. This steamy romance novel featured a shirtless Fabio-look-a-like on the cover stretched out in a seductive pose. This is a seasonal book designed for the holidays. How did I know that? There was a Yule-log fire in the background and the title was The Knight Before Christmas.

What’s the point? There were tens of thousands of books in each of those bookstores. Which caught my eye? Which do I remember? The ones with the clever titles.

If you’re working on a book or writing an article for your website or newsletter, take the time to give it a clever title. It will help get your work the attention it deserves.

www.samhorn.com
www.samhornpop.com

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