“The only danger is not to evolve.” – Jeff Bezoz, Amazon.com

Several years ago I was selected to be on the closing panel of a conference held over the holidays.

Pulitzer Prize winners, astronauts, Fortune 100 CEO’s and Nobel physicists were on the panel and in the audience, so I was excited about this opportunity.

The challenge? I had two minutes max to share an intriguing epiphany with the group.

The night before the panel, I skipped the New Years’ celebration to work on my remarks. My son Andrew came back to our hotel room after midnight and found me still up.

“Whazzup, Mom?”

“Well, I’ve got something to say, but I know it’s not special.”

“Do what you always tell me to do when my brain’s fried. Get up early in the morning and the ideas will come when you’re fresh.”

“Good advice, Andrew. Thanks.” I set the alarm for 6 am and went to bed.

The next morning, I went in search of some caffeine to kick-start my creativity. I turned around after getting my coffee and bumped into a petite powerhouse with big red glasses. I smiled at her and said, “Happy New Year.”

She looked at me, eyes bright, and said, “Start to finish.”

I was instantly intrigued. “How did you come up with that great phrase?”

She said, “Want to set for a spell and I’ll tell you?”

I had a decision to make. Was I supposed to go back to my room and work on my two minutes – or was Dr. Betty Siegel my two minutes?

Suffice it to say, I went with Betty (literally and figuratively).

That conversation not only yielded a fascinating story for my closing remarks, it was the start of a rewarding friendship with the irrepressible Dr. Betty Siegel, President Emeritus of Kennesaw State University.

Betty is, quite simply, the best story-teller I’ve ever known. She doesn’t tell, she shows. She illustrates each idea with a vividly-told, real-life example so we see what she’s saying.

My time with Betty crystallized the following epiphany which, after 20+ years as a professional speaker and published author, has changed the way I communicate:

People don’t want more information – they want epiphanies.

And people don’t get epiphanies from ideas.

They get epiphanies from vividly-told, real-life examples that cause the lights to go on and the band to play.

As a result of that encounter; I’ve developed a Disruptive Communication Manifesto called The 70 – 10 – 10 – 10 Rule® that I now use in all my written and spoken communication and recommend to all my consulting clients and audiences.

Sam Horn- The 70 – 10 – 10 – 10 Rule® is a way to make inanimate information come alive and create a two-way connection

The 70 – 10 – 10 – 10 Rule® is a way to make inanimate information come alive

The 70 – 10 – 10 – 10 Rule is an evolutionary way to instantly engage people so they relate what we’re saying to their circumstances and choose to do something differently – not because they have to – because they want to.

The 70 – 10 – 10 – 10 Rule® is a way to capture and keep people’s valuable attention – from start to finish.
Want to discover exactly how to use Sam Horn’s 70 – 10 – 10 – 10 Rule® to make your ideas come alive so you transform information into epiphanies?

Contact us at Sam@SamHorn.com with “Sam Horn’s 70 – 10 – 10 – 10 Rule®” in the subject heading and we’ll be happy to send info on how to order that e-book, tele-seminar, MP3.

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“Instant gratification takes too long.” – Carrie Fisher

Did you know . . . 1.8 billion vaccinations are given every year?

Did you know . . . half of those vaccinations are given with re-used needles?

Did you know . . . we are spreading and perpetuating the very diseases we’re trying to prevent?

Imagine if there was a painless, one-use needle that cost a fraction of the current model?

You don’t have to imagine it . . . we’ve created it.

In fact, if you look at this article . . .

So went the 60 second opening of one of my clients who used this pitch to convince venture capitalists to invest in her evolutionary product and business.

What’s the point?

Will you be requesting funding or proposing a new initiative in the near future?

How are you going to win buy-in?

What are you going to say in the first 60 seconds to motivate your decision-makers to look up from their Blackberry’s?

If you want people’s valuable time and mind, use the 3 techniques I’ve created and teach my clients to begin with to capture the favorable attention of their decision-makers in the first 60 seconds:

1. Open with three “Did you know?” questions related to the scope of the problem you’re solving. The goal is to elicit a startled “I didn’t know that” from your target audience. One of the ONLY ways to get busy people’s attention is to immediately tell them something they don’t know that piques their curiosity about something that concerns them.

2. Start your next paragraph with the word “Imagine” and use the oratorical “Power of Three” device to paint a mental picture of the ideal scenario. Identify three best-case characteristics of your solution so they’re impressed with the comprehensiveness of your plan, product or program.

3. Bridge to your precedence with the words “You don’t have to imagine it; we’ve created it. In fact, in this . . . .” Then, introduce irrefutable evidence – whether that’s an article, testimonial from a respected source or the actual product – so they SEE your offering as a done deal, not as a speculative venture.

The above techniques instantly engage your audience and cause them to care about what you care about.

Many of my consulting clients have used this compelling opening in their presentations/pitches and have reported back its power to win buy-in to their projects, products and programs.

Next time, you want to shake people out of their preoccupation and motivate them to give you their undivided attention – start your communication with:

1) three intriguing facts they don’t know about your idea, issue or initiative

2) the word “imagine” to paint a mental picture of three characteristics of your solution to this problem

3) the words “You don’t have to imagine it; we’ve created it” so they SEE and BELIEVE what you’re saying and want to hear the rest . . . of your story.