“My job is to talk; your job is to listen. If you finish first, please let me know.” – Harry Herschfield

I’ll never forget it.

This was a national conference featuring the big gun keynoters.

Seth Godin. Tom Peters. Jim Collins. Tim Ferris.

They were all there.

Everyone was on the edge of their seats, listening to every word.

Then, a female CEO of a BILLION dollar company was introduced as the next speaker.

She walked to the center of the stage and stood with her feet together and her hands crossed in the . . . Fig Leaf Position.

Mistake #1.

Standing with your feet together keeps you off-balance and makes you look like you’re teetering and going to fall at any second.

Holding your hands in the Fig leaf Position is a defensive posture that makes you look like you have something to hide.

It pulls your shoulders down and collapses them together which creates a Cower stance that makes you look submissive.

Then, she said softly, in a querulous voice, “I’m so happy to be here today. I was telling my grand-daughter . . .”

Mistake #2.

Whether it’s fair or not, people judge our leadership by the volume and tone of our voice.

A meek voice sends the message you have trouble speaking up for yourself.

A soft voice signals you don’t believe you deserve to be heard.

Those are red flags to anyone deciding whether to hire you, promote you or fund you.

Plus, ending your sentences with upward inflection and speaking in a sing-songy “Valley-Girl” voice makes you seem unsure, hesitant, like you’re seeking approval.

Unfortunately for this CEO (and for the audience because she’s a brilliant leader who is respected by her thousands of employees), the laptops and smart-phones came out within minutes. They had concluded she wasn’t worth listening to.

If you’re speaking to a group of sophisticated entrepreneurs and executives, what can you do differently in the first couple minutes to prove you’re worth their valuable time and mind?

Tip 1. Lose the “I hope you like me” Little Girl Voice.

A coquettish voice will undermine the perception you have the clout to lead a company and carry off a multi-million dollar venture.

Instead, do what TV broadcasters are taught to do their first day on the job.

End your sentences with downward inflection to project a voice of authority.

Try it right now.

Imagine you’re pitching to venture capitalists and they’ve asked, “How much money are you seeking?”

Say, “$500,000” with upward inflection at the end.

Hear how it sounds tentative? Like you tossing it out there and HOPING they say yes?

Now say, “$500,000” with downward inflection at the end.

Hear how it comes across with more certainty? Like this is a justifiable figure you deserve to get?

When presenting, don’t use a conversational tone. It’s too casual.

PROJECT your voice so every single person in the room can hear every single word.

Never, ever force an audience member to have to ask, “Could you please speak up? I can’t hear you.”

The truth is, if people have a hard time hearing you, they often just give up and tune out – or start checking their email.

Don’t risk getting tuned out.

Speak out – loud and clear – and with downward inflection (like your favorite current network news anchor) so you convince people you know what you’re talking about.

Tip 2.

When you get to the center of the stage, plant your feet shoulder width apart and bend your knees slightly so you feel and appear grounded.

This atletic stance helps you feel in your body (vs. in your head).

This more-balanced stance helps you stay “rooted” in one spot so you’re less likely to rock or pace.

Nervous movement patterns distract from your credibility because they give the impression you’re flighty and can’t or won’t hold your ground.

Now, hold your hands out in front of you like you’re holdihg a baskeball. This Basketball Position helps you straighten up and stand tall.

Now, pull your shoulders back and hold your head high.

Aaahh . . .that’s better. Feel how this Tower stance makes you look and feel more confident? It gives you the look of a leader.

As discussed in the previous 3 blogs, if you want decision-makers to CARE, you’ve got to show F.L.A.I.R.

Today’s post was about I = INFLECTION and being IN YOUR BODY.

Check out my previous posts to discover how you can strategically kick-off presentations so everyone in the room is motivated to listen up.

Advertisements

Seth Godin doesn’t follow the crowd.

He doesn’t even lead the crowd.

He creates a NEW crowd.

His new book Linchpin shows how to add value by moving things forward for yourself and others.

His sage advice?

Don’t wait for instructions. Figure it out. Make it happen.

As Seth says, “Every day I meet people who have so much to give but they’ve been bullied or frightened into holding it back.”

He continues, “You have brilliance in you. Your contribution is essential. The art you create is precious. Only you can do it . . . and you must.”

My advice?

Buy Linchpin. Grab a cup of coffee or tea. Read it and reap.

“Find something only you can say.” – James Dickey

We are all looking for singular experiences. Something we haven’t done before.

I had an opportunity to do just that this morning.

I was strolling in front of the sumptuously-set breakfast buffet table, here at the 5 diamond Outrigger Resort in Fiji. Spread out in front of me were papaya, passion fruit, bananas and pineapple; all freshly cut just hours before from the trees and gardens on the grounds.

And there, honored with its own table, was the juicer I had heard about the previous evening. (I’m here to head up the non-fiction portion of the Maui Writers Conference spring trip. Want more info? Check out http://www.MauiWriters.com).

Several participants told me about the delectable pineapple-ginger juice they’d experienced the day before, and told me I simply had to try each morning’s imaginative concoction.

Today’s specialty? Watermelon-mint juice freshly made in front of me by a young Fijian woman. Aaahhh. I savored each exquisite sip. Can’t you just taste it?

Are you wondering what this has to do with POPing out?

This is a magnificent, ocean-front resort. It features lush grounds, a meandering pool surrounded by tropical ferns, a world-class spa, smiling employees and fabulous food. But so does dozens (hundreds?) of other resorts.

Why does this resort stand out? What does it offer that can’t be found elsewhere? Why would I fly half way around the world to come here – and why would I recommend others do the same?

Well, that lip-smacking, one-of-a-kind juice creation each morning is a good start. It was a singular experience I will remember and tell others about. It turned me into a word-of-mouth ambassador for the Outrigger Resort in Fiji because they delivered a singular experience.

Think of your business, book, brand or blog. Do they deliver a singular experience people haven’t had before? Have you, as James Dickey suggested, found something only you can say? Are you offering something that can’t be found elsewhere?

If so, good for you. You’re on your way to being one-of-a-kind instead of one-of-many.

If not, you might want to visit http://www.SamHornPOP.com to buy a copy of POP! Stand Out in Any Crowd, which Seth Godin calls “revolutionary.” It will help you discover your “singularity” and map out a step-by-step strategy for establishing yourself and your organization/project as the go-to, top-of-mind resource in your field.